Connect with us

Editorial/OP-ED

Opinion | Don’t Return to the Office for Your Boss. Go Back for Yourself.

Published

on

Americans often spend a third to more than half of their waking hours working, so work is inevitably where many of our bonds and friendships are formed. The old way of mixing business with pleasure had its problems — golf, after-work drinks and other forced “fun” activities aren’t for everyone, especially parents or those who don’t drink alcohol. But there are ways to get to know colleagues that feel more progressive — from shared meals to book clubs, to simply grabbing a coffee or going for a walk with a colleague during the workday.

Opinion Conversation
What will work and life look like after the pandemic?
Advertisement

I know that if I had stayed home early in my career, I would have missed out on finding the friends and mentors who played critical roles in my life. The office was also where I figured out how my industry works, the nature of power hierarchies and how to get along with all kinds of people.

Staying home might seem easier for workers who, for one reason or another, don’t feel comfortable at the office, but it can also let employers off the hook when it comes to making the office more inclusive. If the social movements of the past few years have told us anything, it’s that showing up and speaking up about what isn’t working can bring meaningful change.

Company leaders have plenty to learn, too. My advice to them is to listen to their employees, and learn from workers at all stages of their careers and lives what they need to do their best work. They also must learn to trust their employees, and to grant them more autonomy and control over how they get their work done. They would do well to remember that when the pandemic forced many people to work from home, their employees largely remained committed and productive.

Inclusivity needs to be intentional. Hybrid models should not create new hierarchies that place a premium on in-person face time, and companies must create working experiences that give people real reasons to commute. Those might include meaningful opportunities to socialize and celebrate wins, well-designed facilities and a welcoming work culture. Some companies are experimenting with ways to reshape the office experience for the hybrid era, creating new systems for meetings that don’t exclude remote workers, or even looking into installing video conferencing screens in office kitchens to allow those working from home to engage in small talk and “water cooler chats.”

I can’t remember exactly how I answered that new hire at Goldman who asked about bringing her “whole self” to work, but since then I have had to answer versions of that question many more times. Now I make this plea to you, young office workers: Bring your whole self back to the office. Don’t come back for your boss; come back for yourself. Embrace what you like, work to change what you don’t, and help create a workplace that’s truly rewarding and supportive.

Read the full article here

Advertisement

A journalist since 1994, he also founded DMGlobal Marketing & Public Relations. Glover has an extensive list of clients including corporations, non-profits, government agencies, politics, business owners, PR firms, and attorneys.

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Editorial/OP-ED

Timothy and Feather – An Urban Tale

Published

on

(Montgomery Village, Maryland – November 18, 2022) – Timothy was perched on a tree limb, watching the hawk fly circles in the sky. It was a beautiful sight. Timothy had always been fascinated by the bird. He admired its’ grace and power. And it was his mission to catch this hawk!

Then, without warning, the hawk swooped down at its future owner, Timothy, who quickly ducked out of the way, but not before getting gashed, on the back, by the hawk’s talons. The hawk crashed to the ground with a thud, tangled in Timothy’s net.

Timothy couldn’t believe his luck! He had captured his very own hawk! Now he would be able to train it to be his personal pet.

He took Feather, the hawk, home and started to train her how to obey commands. She was a quick learner and soon they were working together like a well-oiled machine. They fought crime in their small town in Mississippi and saved many people from danger.

Townspeople began to come up with a name for the duo.

 

If you’re reading this story, if you have a name for the tag team duo, email me at robaerwashington@yahoo.com.

Continue Reading

Editorial/OP-ED

5 Ways to Attract Community Grants

Published

on

Attracting community grants is essential for any non-profit organization, and Baltimore-based organizations are no exception. To attract community grant funds, Baltimore-based non-profits should focus on five key strategies: Outreach and Networking, Research and Writing, Proposal Development, Budget Preparation, and Evaluation.

Continue Reading

Editorial/OP-ED

Keeping Good Character and a Good Name – In The Past, In The Present

Published

on

Mr. Robaer D. Washington

(GAITHERSBURG, MD) –

This week I crossed paths with two of my good friends from my college days at Howard University: one I hadn’t seen in ten years, another I hadn’t seen in 15 years. The basic respect was still there and in those two instances we were able to make time with each other (at least 15 minutes each) without neither of us feeling that there was a need to rush off. I was even able to exchange phone numbers with both.

After 15 years there can be some level of angst about exchanging personal contact information with another that you have not seen in years. Questions CAN begin to arise: what do they want from me; I hope they don’t ask for money; is this bum gonna ask me out on a date (one of my encounters was a female, lol), etc., questions that can lead to this angst. But that was not the case with my encounters.

The purpose of this short article is to remind readers of this: keep good character and keep good reputation. Also, wear clean clothes and keep good hygiene. When people from your past encounter you, in the future, those former memories of the positive times that they had with you should be on the forefront of their minds when they interact with you.

Continue Reading

Trending